Comments

  1. Great information on sharing images. I prefer to make my own images and share on social media. But, if I do share an image from another company’s Facebook Page (for example), I will include their link back to their site or their Facebook page. I also recommend this to my clients. I agree small businesses should be careful when sharing images. No one wants to get into trouble.

    • So glad you make your own Sabrina, I do the same for my website, blog and at least 1 a day for sharing… but yea, great point

  2. We have been doing some interesting strategy on Pinterest that has me checking sources. OMG. Pins that go nowhere. Pins from Flicker where it clearly says may have copyright issues.
    For FB and twitter, we tend to make our own, which we like doing, but there is much confusion and not giving attrition out there.

    • Glad you are doing some research Roz and I have found some of the same thing over on Pinterest… irritating indeed

  3. Great post, Kristen, about images. This has been a sore issue with a lot of people. You’re the first I’ve seen to address the issue of sharing on social media and Pinterest pins. In my newsletter, if I’m curating someone else’s material I always post an image that I’ve vetted and not the one associated with the article.

  4. I actually learned this the hard way, Kristen! When I first started using images, I didn’t know this. Thank goodness my seo folks did! Now I purchase mine, and they aren’t expensive. Whew!

    • There are some great places to get many images and NOT pay up the rear for them… sorry you had to learn the hard way Susan.. .but glad you are on top of it now.

  5. Great advice Kristen and something a lot of people don’t think about. I usually try and use my own images (though my photography skills are atrocious) or build an image using Canva, so I can avoid the confusion about attribution. I would hate to get a fine.

    • I would photograph more Tami, if I got out more… lol However, business images I need… kind of hard for me to do anyhow. lol

  6. All the images used in my branding…from my book to my website, were purchased from IStock I believe and my designer throughly checked the license before we bought them. I use a lot of my own photos for the posts I do and also my FB and Twitter graphics with quotes. I also use Pixabay a lot. They have fabulous images, they are all creative commons and most of them do not want attribution. I do contribute to the creative commons pool by giving money to the photographers. My understanding is Pixabay shares it based on popularity and downloads. I remember the days when I unknowingly did think that finding an image on Google, meant you could use it. I do know better and funnily, I found one of my images there now when I was searching a specific quote to use again. It’s great to bring all this info to the possibly uninformed, Kristen. Especially as the online world is becoming more and more visual oriented. Thanks!

    • Why thank you very much Beverly and we all have to learn somehow, hopefully not with expensive repercussions though!

  7. Take this to heart my friends! I play by the rules, but made the mistake if using an image from the photopin site. All on me – I misinterpreted the Creative Commons license for the image. And a company that goes after folks on behalf of photographers contacted, made me aware of my mistake AND threatened litigation if I didn’t pay what amounted to a one time use fee (and it was not cheap). We went back and forth for several months but in the end I was advised to pay the fee and not risk court proceedings – ignorance is no excuse and all. Now I use my own photos and images when I can, or make damn sure I read the fine print. Tough lesson learned.

    • That IS a very tough lesson Kim and I’m sorry you had to deal with that… lesson learned.. moving forward… thank you for sharing, for sure.

  8. I learned this lesson the hard way. On one of my older blogs I would grab images from anywhere…until I received a letter from Getty Images several years ago. They requested a large amount of money; however, we had coincidentally replaced that image already. I ignored the letter and, fortunately, I did not hear from them again.

  9. I take a lot of my images, and I get some from Canva and Death to Stock Photos…I did use a celeb picture I got off google once, but I attributed it and put a link back to the original source… I hope it doesn’t come back to bite me!

    • Good that you buy yours.. but just be careful with just attributing, unless you get explicit content, it is not free game. Hope it doesn’t come back to you Kimberly.

  10. I have seen this happen to a lot of people I know. Google is not the way to go about obtaining professional pictures for your business.

  11. Oh yes. Allow me to be your bad example. Many years ago, when I was just starting out and was young(er) and foolish, I picked up a terrific image on Google. Many years later, I got a letter in the mail from one of the big image powerhouses saying, in essence, “You used a copyrighted image for you own use and you owe us $500.” Talk about heart-attack city! As you mention, the photo has been used and shared and reshared to many times the origin was lost in the mists of time. I was able to negotiate that number down, but it was still an expense I could ill-afford. Since then, I’ve purchased images that I want to brand, and keep Google shares to an absolute minimum.

    • You were Jackie, I just didn’t mention your name. lol But sadly you had to deal with that situation, but lesson learned, the hard way, unfortunately.

  12. Thanks Kristen for this awesome and very important post on using images, especially if they are not your own 🙂 I am guilty of using images from Google, I will be re-thinking that 🙂 Appreciate the info! Always good to know so you do not get in trouble 🙂

    • I surely hope you do Joan, it will cost you more than the cost of a small membership elsewhere.

  13. Thanks for this great reminder on images. I love to take photos and use my own for most of my blog posts, but also have a couple of places that I get photos from. At first I tried to google, but realized quickly that most weren’t usable or the attribution info was hard to find, so I stopped. Photographers work hard to capture beautiful images.

  14. Kristen – Another little thing about purchasing the rights to an image is that the license to use it can be short-term or long term. I found out the hard way buying a short-term license to use a photo of a woman’s face for the cover of my book -I had the picture altered appropriately, and then went back to purchase a long-term license, only to find that it was then not available!! I had to start all over with a different book cover – lesson learned.

  15. Hi Kristen Wilson,
    I was looking for the same article topic on Search Engine, But I found you on Google+, Yes you are right, I am taking the pics from free licencing sites like – Pixabay etc. Is it secure to use their images for our blog post.
    and one more question is there any site from where we check the copyrighting images.

    • I would just suggest buying your images from a picture site… or check the creative license for the sites you go to and use. I would never use/find images on Google… as you don’t know where they came from Harman. Thanks for asking.

  16. Thanks Kristen for sharing the guidelines about images selection. Generally, every blogger and newbie marketers save images from Google search engine. It is very important to select the image which is labeled for commercial use. You shared an amazing tips and value in this.

    • And usually you won’t find, “for commercial use” on Google.. you have to pay for that service. Thank you for stopping by Kajal

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